The Facts

The Facts

30 million American adults are estimated to have chronic kidney disease—and most do no know it. 1 in 3 American adults are at risk for chronic kidney disease. Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity and family history of kidney failure. People of African American, Hispanic, Native American, Asian or Pacific Islander descent are at increased risk for developing the disease. African Americans are 3 times more likely than Whites, and Hispanics are nearly 1.5 times more likely than non-Hispanics to develop end-stage renal disease, most commonly known as kidney failure.

This health crisis and the need to solve the problem through living kidney donations versus years of dialysis, are highlighted in this 60-second video public service announcement (PSA) produced by the National Kidney Foundation (NKF).  The PSA features two prominent African American women dedicated to fighting kidney disease: Kidney transplant surgeon Velma Scantlebury-White, MD, America’s first African American female transplant surgeon; and New York business executive Tracy McKibben, who donated a kidney to her mother.

The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is the largest, most comprehensive and longstanding organization dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease. For more information about kidney disease, click here.